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  • Alabama Treatment Facility Breakdown by Type:
  • (74) Alcohol Addiction Treatment
  • (74) Outpatient Alcohol Treatment
  • (45) Hearing Impaired Clients
  • (8) Spanish Speaking
  • (16) Mental Stability and Alcohol Abuse Treatment
  • (21) Alcohol Detox
  • (12) Residential Short-Term Treatment for Alcoholism
  • (19) Residential Long-Term Treatment for Alcohol Abuse
  • (17) Expectant Mothers
  • (26) Women
  • (12) Transitional Living Services
  • (23) Men
  • (24) Dual Diagnosis
  • (22) Services for Young Adults
  • (10) Alcohol Day Treatment Services
  • (5) Inpatient Hospital Treatment
  • (9) AIDS/HIV Clients
  • (15) Court Appointed Client Services
  • (3) Residential Beds for Adolescents
  • (6) DUI - DWI Offenders
  • (4) Lesbian and Gay
  • (5) Over 50
  • (2) Health Services
  • (2) Foreign Languages other than Spanish
  • (1) Mental Balance Treatment Services
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Alcohol addiction is steadily on the rise in the state of Alabama and the need for quality alcohol rehabs have never been greater. There are many different types of alcohol rehabilitation programs in and around Alabama, which can include inpatient, outpatient, long term , and short term treatment, just to name a few. An effective alcohol rehab facility will include components that specifically address the multiple needs of each individual from Alabama.

When an individual from Alabama makes a commitment to participate with an alcohol treatment center, they will have a choice of what type of alcohol rehabilitation will benefit them the most. One alcohol treatment option is outpatient alcohol rehab; this type of alcohol rehabilitation allows the individual from Alabama to attend treatment and to still be able to meet their obligations at home. Another option is inpatient alcohol rehab, which will allow the individual from Alabama to reside at the alcohol rehabilitation facility where they will be able to focus solely on their treatment program, 24 hours a day.

The first component of any Alabama alcohol rehab program is the alcohol detox. Alcohol detoxification is very serious and can be accompanied with severe withdrawal symptoms. It is recommended that the detoxification process be overseen by a professional. It is vitally important that the detox process be followed up with a comprehensive alcohol rehabilitation program that includes some form of counseling or group classes, relapse prevention education and follow up care. The primary goal of any quality alcohol rehab should be to enable the individual from Alabama to be able to successfully achieve a state of lasting abstinence.


Alabama alcohol related information and statistics are provided by the US Dept. of Transportation, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the National Conference of State Legislatures, 2004. The percentage of alcohol related fatalities in Alabama was highest in 1983, but the actual number of alcohol related deaths was highest in 1986. Since then, the percentage and actual number of drunk driving deaths in Alabama has decreased significantly. In 2006, out of all traffic fatalities, 32% involved a blood alcohol concentration of 0.08 or higher.

The table below shows the total number of traffic fatalities (Tot) for Alabama, alcohol related fatalities (Alc-Rel) and fatalities in crashes where the highest BAC in the crash was 0.08 or above (0.08+). It is important to note that the drunk driving statistics for Alabama, as shown below, include data from individuals who were in an alcohol-related crash, but not driving a motor vehicle at the time. The U.S. Department of Transportation defines alcohol-related deaths as "fatalities that occur in crashes where at least one driver or non-occupant (pedestrian or pedalcyclist) involved in the crash has a positive Blood Alcohol Concentration (BAC) value."

All 50 states in the US now apply two statutory offenses to operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol. The first (and original) offense is known either as driving under the influence (DUI), driving while intoxicated/impaired (DWI), or operating while intoxicated/impaired (OWI). This is based upon an Alabama police officer's observations (driving behavior, slurred speech, the results of a roadside sobriety test, etc.) The second offense is called "illegal per se", which is driving with a BAC of 0.08% or higher. Since 2002 it has been illegal in all 50 states to drive with a BAC that is 0.08% or higher.

Year

Fatalities

Tot

Alc-Rel

%

0.08+

%

1982

839

486

58

436

52

1983

930

573

62

508

55

1984

932

537

58

465

50

1985

882

439

50

385

44

1986

1,081

609

56

524

48

1987

1,111

596

54

524

47

1988

1,024

503

49

437

43

1989

1,029

527

51

448

44

1990

1,121

583

52

520

46

1991

1,116

551

49

494

44

1992

1,031

498

48

446

43

1993

1,044

476

46

433

41

1994

1,083

472

44

422

39

1995

1,114

494

44

441

40

1996

1,146

516

45

460

40

1997

1,192

499

42

438

37

1998

1,071

442

41

389

36

1999

1,138

465

41

422

37

2000

996

426

43

375

38

2001

991

374

38

330

33

2002

1,038

410

39

366

35

2003

1,001

415

41

376

38

2004

1,154

442

38

394

34

2005

1,131

423

37

382

34

2006

1,206

445

37

384

32

'

2003-2004 Alabama Alcohol Related Issue: Percentage % Ranking

Alcohol Abuse or Dependence

5.97%

[51st of 51]

Alcohol consumption > Binge drinkers

12.7%

[41st of 52]

Alcohol consumption > Casual drinkers

40.2%

[46th of 52]

Alcohol consumption > Heavy drinkers

4%

[42nd of 52]

Alcohol related traffic fatalities

442

[13th of 51]

Alcohol related traffic fatalities (per capita)

0.97 per 10,000 people

[8th of 51]

Alcohol related traffic fatalities, as a percentage

38%

[29th of 51]

Alcohol Use in the Past Month

39.17%

[47th of 51]

Sources: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 2003-2004, Office of Applied Studies 2003-2004 and the MADD Official Website statistics 2004

When is a driver considered to be legally drunk in Alabama?

  • Non-commercial drivers in Alabama that are age 21+ are considered legally drunk when their blood alcohol level is .08 or more.
  • Alabama drivers of commercial vehicles are legally drunk when their blood alcohol level is .04 percent or greater.
  • School bus and day care drivers in Alabama are legally drunk when their blood alcohol level is greater than .02.
  • Alabama drivers under 21 are legally drunk when their blood alcohol level is .02 or more.

Penalties for Drunk Driving in Alabama

  • First-time offenders in Alabama face imprisonment for up to one year, a fine of $600 to $2,100, or both. The driver's license suspension period is 90 days. First-time offenders are also required to attend an Alabama DUI or substance abuse program.
  • A person in Alabama who commits a second DUI within five years of the first offense faces imprisonment, which may include hard labor, for up to one year. The fine ranges from $1,100 to $5,100. The driver's license revocation period is one year.
  • On a third conviction, the Alabama offender faces a prison term, which may include hard labor, of up to one year. The fine ranges from $2,100 to $10,100. The driver's license revocation period is three years.
  • On a fourth or subsequent conviction, the Alabama offender faces a prison term of one year and one day to 10 years. The fine ranges from $4,100 to $10,100. The driver's license revocation period is five years.

Enhanced Penalty for Drunk Driving While a Child Under 14 was in the Vehicle
When a person 21 or older is convicted of drunk driving in Alabama and a child under 14 was in the vehicle at the time of the offense, the offender will be sentenced to double the minimum criminal punishment that he or she would have received had the child not been in the car.

Commercial Drivers
In addition to other penalties that may be imposed under Alabama's DUI laws, a commercial driver in Alabama who commits a first DUI while driving any vehicle will be disqualified from driving a commercial vehicle for one year. If, however, the offense was committed while the driver was operating a commercial vehicle and transporting hazardous materials, the disqualification period is three years. If a commercial driver in Alabama is convicted of a second DUI while driving any vehicle, the offender will be disqualified from driving a commercial vehicle for life, which may or may not be reduced to a period of 10 years.

School Bus and Day Care Drivers
In addition to other penalties that may be imposed under Alabama's DUI laws, school bus and day care drivers who are convicted of DUI for the first time in Alabama will receive an automatic one-year driver's license suspension.

Drivers Under 21
On a first violation, a minor whose blood alcohol level is between .02 and .08 will receive an automatic 30-day license suspension. The minor must also attend an Alabama DUI or substance abuse program. A minor who is found guilty of DUI in Alabama will be required to pay the same fines as an adult offender.

What is Alabama's Civil Damages Act?
Under Alabama law, parents can sue a person who sells alcohol to their child if that person knew the child was under 21 at the time of the sale and if alcohol played a role in causing the child's injury. The Louisiana legislature designed this law to deter the sale of alcohol to minors. The law places the burden on sellers of alcoholic beverages to determine that purchasers are not minors. If a seller doesn't carry that burden, the law permits a jury to assess damages as it sees fit.

What is Alabama's Dram Shop Act?
This law creates a civil action against owners of Alabama drinking establishments that provide alcohol to visibly intoxicated persons who later cause injury to another person because of their intoxication. Alabama's Dram Shop Act permits suit to be brought by the injured person or by the injured person's spouse, child, or parent.

What is Alabama's "Open House Party" Statute?
Under Alabama law, it is a crime for an adult to allow an "open house party" at his or her residence where alcohol is consumed by persons under 21. A violation of this law is punishable by up to six months in prison, which may include hard labor.

Criminal Penalties for Selling Alcohol to Minors
It is a crime for a licensed Alabama drinking establishment to sell alcohol to a minor. A first-time offender faces up to six months in jail, which may include hard labor, and a fine of $100 to $1,000. A second-time offender will serve three to six months in prison and be fined $100 to $1,000. On a third conviction, the offender will serve six to 12 months in prison and be fined $100 to $1,000.

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  • Drinking increases the risk of death from automobile crashes as well as recreational and on-the-job injuries.
  • According to the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), twin and adoption studies performed over the past two decades clearly suggests that a genetic susceptibility for alcoholism in families exists
  • The United States has adopted 0.08% as the legal limit for drinking for drivers that are aged 21 or older, but drivers that are younger than this are not allowed to operate a vehicle with any level of alcohol in their system.
  • Children with alcoholic parents may be at a greater risk for excessive drinking resulting from developmental factors that lower sensitivity to alcohol.